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‘The Most Abandoned Villains of Wexford’

Some say it’s the deep sounding whoosh from the revolving blades of the enormous turbines at Carnsore Point, in county Wexford. But when they rest, others will offer; it’s the confusion of winds that can blow around this large expanse of low lands, a place of prolonged periods of light, where two seas, the Atlantic […]
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Nestorian WK Auction

WHEN IS A WRECK NOT A WRECK ?

An answer seems easy, but not always obvious. A ship that has been wrecked might be raised and then float again. It might sink again, immediately, or soon after – and declared a wreck once more. It may be repaired, and live out many more years afloat. Alternatively, the raised wreck may be towed away […]
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Bay of Shipwrecks

Local Wexford people know it as the, ‘Graveyard of a Thousand Ships’. There are that many lost ships there, and probably some more. The primary reason for such a large amount of unfortunate losses is quite simple – traffic. This part of Ireland represents a major crossroads for shipping, of increased importance, and more fatal […]
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‘Murphy’s Sub’

After all those years. We followed up on every bar-room story, endless tales by fishermen, and all of the mucky folklore that was ever recounted about this wreck – that of a submarine lying on the Arklow Bank. Probably known to many now, a much abbreviated version of the tale goes as follows. In 1917 […]
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Between The Tides (Shipwrecks on the Irish Coast)

  Link to Amberley Books – https://www.amberley-books.com/between-the-tides.html   Between The Tides is a new book just launched by the author of this site. Supported by a large volume research, and accounts of a number of historic instances that have occurred around the coast of Ireland, the author sets out to examine the history of shipwreck, and […]
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“The South Arklow Light Vessel has Disappeared”

Accurate, but defying an explanation, the announcement as it appears above, was posted in the Custom House, Dublin, on March 31, 1917. Its brevity can be partly explained by war time secrecy, and an importance in preventing the general public and the German navy becoming familiar with British naval matters. The statement did nevertheless indicate […]
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All Measures Neccessary

Author’s Note Considered inappropriate at the time, the following piece represents a chapter that was deleted in total, from the publication ‘U-Boat Alley’, by Roy Stokes, 2004. It has remained largely unchanged since then. The book is an account of the U-boat campaign in Irish waters, and part in British. This campaign, reached a stage, […]
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A Liverpool frigate like ship from 1783 - could be the Belgioioso.

Comte de Belgioioso an Odyssey

Ostendse Compagnie The ongoing research and hunt for the remains of the ship ‘Count de Belgioioso’ is fascinating story on many levels. And more, it has been an exciting journey. As much as I would love to recount the whole story here, one that would deservingly fill many pages, it is therefore much too lengthy […]
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U-Boats Sink the Mail-Boat Leinster and Others in the Irish Channel

The Atlantic Gateway  (Jim Phelan 1941) When ships crossed the channel between Ireland and England during WW1, they were attacked and sunk by German submarines. The loss of ships, Irish or not, with civilians, service men and women, was not only condemned by those considered to be ‘West Brits’, but anger and a sense of […]
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The Legend of the Ouzel Galley – A Fresh Look

The story of the ‘Ouzel Galley’ is already out there – but is it one we can believe? Our tale will be a collection of the facts. It won’t rely on any novels or on the ramblings of members of a secret society, and will not claim to be the last word on the matter. […]